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Artist: TULLY
Title: Sea Of Joy
Format: LP
Label: Anthology
Country: USA
Price: $19.00
"Sea of Joy was director Paul Witzigs fourth surf film and his first to deviate from the tried and sounds of The Sunsets / Tamam Shud. To express his cinematic vision, Witzig chose the enchanting sounds of Tully, the legendary Sydney band who rose from the ashes of Levi Smiths Clefs into prominence as the backing band for the June 1969 Australian production of the musical HAIR. Like many surfers and non-surfers alike, Witzig had been mesmerised by Tullys concert performances. By the time finished filming his latest surfing epic, Evolution, the sound of Tully had changed though. Gone was the organ-dominated sound (the group was reputedly the first Australian band to use the Moog synthesiser), replaced by more gentle melodies, many with spiritual significance. This new mood and mode which was prompted by the groups involvement with the Meher Baba religious sect. Terry Wilson, the groups vocalist, was the only one not enamoured by the Indian spirital guru, cementing the cornerstone of personnel uneasiness besetting the quintet. Defiant of his bandmembers lifestyle, Wilson was subsequently replaced when Tully merged with a similarly structured – musically and religiously – group, Extradtion. It was this symbiosis of sound and idealogy that subsequently produced the Sea of Joy soundtrack, a collection of themes rather than standard self-contained songs. Recorded at EMIs Sydney studios, Tullys soundtrack material was subsequently edited for the album release into cohesive musical interludes. As such, they are held together in the album sequence by a magnetic musical flow that starts with “Sea Of Joy (Part 1)” and ends with “Sea Of Joy (Part 2).”

As part of the free-flowing musical journey the listeners are both mesmerized by the colorful and fluid sounds of the band in total and enchanted by the sweet vocals of Shayna Stewart (née Karlin). Longtime group member and multi-instrimentalist Michael Carlos lords over organ, sitar, piano, drums and bass. And even Witzig provided gong and gamelan to the new version of “I Feel The Sun,” a tune previously recorded by Extradition (and included on the Hush album). Although the music and foley presented via the soundtrack and album to Sea of Joy were initially misunderstood by both the record buying public and the surfer audience expecting a different Tully sound, the material worked exceedingly well with the visuals, exquisitely expressing what Witzig as a surf filmmaker had conjured cinematically. And although none of the members of Tully were surfers, they were nonetheless appreciative of the natural beauty and power of the ocean and the largely relaxed disposition associated with surfer lifestyle. Its perhaps Tullys acceptance and ease that inspires one of the more unique surf soundtracks of its time.This newly restored classic caresses shores beyond Australias beaches for the first time ever for Anthologys Surf Archives. Vinyl edition features booklet liner notes by Aussie surf historian Stephen McParland and other-wordly ephemera." - Anthology.

Artist: TULLY
Title: Live At Sydney Town Hall, 1969-70
Format: CD
Label: Chapter
Country: Australia
Price: $16.00
"Chapter Music presents two rare live recordings from quintessential Sydney prog group Tully, including their 1970 performance of Australias first-ever rock opera. These recordings capture the band in their first incarnation, before they joined forces with members of revered folk-psych band Extradition to explore more contemplative territory. Formed in late 1968, Tully The First were wild, expansive and unpredictable, their live shows now the stuff of legend. Terry Wilson (vocals), Richard Lockwood (reeds), Michael Carlos (organ), John Blake (bass) and Robert Taylor (drums) employed extended improvisation, spacious dynamics and an intuitive intensity, so impressing Australian jazz icon John Sangster that he called them "the best band in the world at the time." In mid 69, Tully became the house band for love-rock musical Hair, recording the original cast album later that year. They also starred in a six-part live-in-studio series Fusions, which premiered on ABC TV in August 1969. "Sights & Sounds Of 69," from a May show of the same name, is the only live Tully recording to have survived the intervening four decades, and documents a typically far-ranging, mind-expanding performance. Ken Firth (later of the Ferrets) replaced John Blake on bass in December 1969. Perhaps Australias greatest living composer, Peter Sculthorpe wrote "Love 200" specifically with Tully and vocalist Jeannie Lewis in mind. The work, commemorating Captain Cooks expedition to map the Transit Of Venus in 1769, was dismissed by the stuffy classical establishment at the time, but Sculthorpe now calls it simply "one of my best works." Heard here for the first time since the early 70s, "Love 200" is an astounding piece, both elegant and jarring, serene and chaotic. After Tullys 1970 self-titled debut, Wilson and Taylor left the band, which then assimilated Extraditions Shayna Stewart and Colin Campbell before releasing two more albums, Sea Of Joy (1971) and Loving Is Hard (1972), both markedly different from their fiery and often thunderous early form. Live At Sydney Town Hall, 1969-70 is a fascinating insight into the early work of one of Australias most heralded, but least-heard bands." -Chapter

Artist: TULLY
Title: Loving Is Hard
Format: LP
Label: Chapter Music
Country: Australia
Price: $18.00
"Includes download card for the entire album, plus a bonus 1971 single. Luminous third and final album, Loving Is Hard, originally released in 1972, is the latest in Chapter Musics reissue series of Australian psychedelic icons, Tully. This follows the 2010 release of Live at Sydney Town Hall 1969-70 (CH 076CD), and 2012s reissue of the solemn, dreamy 1971 surf soundtrack Sea of Joy (CH 080CD/LP). Even before they began recording Loving Is Hard in late 1971, Tully had officially broken up. Over the previous 12 months, they had shifted from the towering, organ-driven rock dynamics of their 1970 self-titled debut, to a serene, contemplative folk-psych sound. Show-stopping drummer Robert Taylor and original vocalist Terry Wilson had departed, replaced by guitarist Colin Campbell and singer Shayna Stewart, both of cult folk heroes, Extradition. Although the change created music of stark, unearthly beauty, Tully had been massively popular in Sydney as a rock band, and their spiritually-driven transformation left many fans scratching their heads. Audiences declined steadily, response to the Sea of Joy soundtrack was muted, and by the end of 1971 they realized they could no longer continue. Still, they had one more album owing on their record contract, and decided to make a final statement before going their separate ways. Thankfully for us, in hindsight Loving Is Hard is an elegant triumph, all the more affecting for the turmoil that went into its making. The records centerpiece is Colin Campbells seven-and-a-half minute masterwork "Ice," originally recorded by Extradition for their 1971 album Hush, and later covered by Margret Roadknight. Shayna Stewarts voice is sublimely dispassionate, while the string arrangement by keyboardist Michael Carlos gives the song an imposing grandeur. The title-track, with lyrics by Campbell and music by bassist Ken Firth, is a summation of what the band were going through at the time, and for that reason is perhaps the most emotionally resonant track on the record. Stewarts gentle vibrato matches Carlos pulsing Hammond organ, and the resignation in Campbells lyrics is reinforced by Firths slow, haunting melody. Saxophone, clarinet and flute player Richard Lockwood opens the album with the stately "Love Can Make You," and sets a poem by fellow Meher Baba-devotee Francis Brabazon to solo piano accompaniment. As bonus tracks, this reissue appends Tullys one and only single, the sparse and somber 1971 release Krishna Came/Lord Baba. Like Sea of Joy before it, Loving Is Hard possesses a profound, serene beauty worlds removed from anything else happening in Australia at the time. Along with Tullys other albums, it has had to wait far too long to be rediscovered." -Chapter.

Artist: TULLY
Title: Loving Is Hard
Format: CD
Label: Chapter Music
Country: Australia
Price: $16.00
"Luminous third and final album, Loving Is Hard, originally released in 1972, is the latest in Chapter Musics reissue series of Australian psychedelic icons, Tully. This follows the 2010 release of Live at Sydney Town Hall 1969-70 (CH 076CD), and 2012s reissue of the solemn, dreamy 1971 surf soundtrack Sea of Joy (CH 080CD/LP). Even before they began recording Loving Is Hard in late 1971, Tully had officially broken up. Over the previous 12 months, they had shifted from the towering, organ-driven rock dynamics of their 1970 self-titled debut, to a serene, contemplative folk-psych sound. Show-stopping drummer Robert Taylor and original vocalist Terry Wilson had departed, replaced by guitarist Colin Campbell and singer Shayna Stewart, both of cult folk heroes, Extradition. Although the change created music of stark, unearthly beauty, Tully had been massively popular in Sydney as a rock band, and their spiritually-driven transformation left many fans scratching their heads. Audiences declined steadily, response to the Sea of Joy soundtrack was muted, and by the end of 1971 they realized they could no longer continue. Still, they had one more album owing on their record contract, and decided to make a final statement before going their separate ways. Thankfully for us, in hindsight Loving Is Hard is an elegant triumph, all the more affecting for the turmoil that went into its making. The records centerpiece is Colin Campbells seven-and-a-half minute masterwork "Ice," originally recorded by Extradition for their 1971 album Hush, and later covered by Margret Roadknight. Shayna Stewarts voice is sublimely dispassionate, while the string arrangement by keyboardist Michael Carlos gives the song an imposing grandeur. The title-track, with lyrics by Campbell and music by bassist Ken Firth, is a summation of what the band were going through at the time, and for that reason is perhaps the most emotionally resonant track on the record. Stewarts gentle vibrato matches Carlos pulsing Hammond organ, and the resignation in Campbells lyrics is reinforced by Firths slow, haunting melody. Saxophone, clarinet and flute player Richard Lockwood opens the album with the stately "Love Can Make You," and sets a poem by fellow Meher Baba-devotee Francis Brabazon to solo piano accompaniment. As bonus tracks, this reissue appends Tullys one and only single, the sparse and somber 1971 release Krishna Came/Lord Baba. Like Sea of Joy before it, Loving Is Hard possesses a profound, serene beauty worlds removed from anything else happening in Australia at the time. Along with Tullys other albums, it has had to wait far too long to be rediscovered." -Chapter Music.

Artist: TULLY
Title: Sea of Joy
Format: LP
Label: Chapter Music
Country: Australia
Price: $18.00
"Australian psychedelic icons Tullys solemn, dreamy 1971 surf soundtrack Sea of Joy. Sea of Joy documents a period of massive change for the band. For the previous two years, they had arguably been Australias most dynamic rock group, renowned for their wild, largely improvised concerts. Their rise was meteoric, from Sydney house band for tribal love-rock musical Hair in 1969, to starring in six-part ABC TV series Fusions and performing Peter Sculthorpe rock opera Love 200 at the Sydney Town Hall. By 1970, when they released their self-titled debut album, Tully were rock stars of a very rare order in Australian music, feted by highbrow critics and teenage groupies alike. Within a year, however, almost everything changed. Showstopping drummer Robert Taylor departed the band, swiftly followed by vocalist Terry Wilson, and the remainder of Tully joined forces with members of gentle, exploratory folk group, Extradition. Suddenly, Tully were rockers no longer. Flautist, clarinetist, saxophonist and de facto band leader Richard Lockwood had approached surfing director Paul Witzig after his now-iconic 1969 film Evolution (for which Tully had contributed some music alongside Sydney colleagues Tamam Shud), offering to record an entire soundtrack to his next film. Witzig had agreed when Tully were a towering rock band, driven by Michael Carlos massive Hammond organ and Lockwoods exploratory reeds, but by the time Sea of Joy came to be recorded, they were a drummer-less, contemplative folk-psych outfit, dedicated to spiritual guru Meher Baba. Although unexpected, the results were luminous. Sea of Joy radiates a serene purity, miles removed from what people generally think of as surf music, but as Witzig wrote on the back cover, "Tully are not surfers, but there proved to be many things common to both our worlds: a feeling for peace, beauty, simplicity and freedom." New member Colin Campbell contributes "I Feel the Sun," also recorded by Extradition for their lone, celebrated album Hush in 1971. The miraculous voice of Shayna Stewart is also heard for the first time on the Lockwood-penned title track. Humble, disarming and sublime, Sea of Joy is a record like very few others in the Australian rock canon. But like Tullys other albums, it has had to wait far too long to be rediscovered. Includes free mp3 download." - Chapter Music.

Artist: TULLY
Title: Tully
Format: LP
Label: Chapter Music
Country: Australia
Price: $18.00
Gatefold LP version with download code. "Chapter Music is thrilled to present the first-ever reissue of the self-titled debut album by Sydneys famed prog-psych giants, Tully. Originally released in June 1970, Tully is the final release in Chapters series of Tully reissues, which takes in surf soundtrack Sea Of Joy (1971), final album Loving Is Hard (1972) and Peter Sculthorpes composed rock opera Love 200 (released on 2010 CD Live at Sydney Town Hall 1969-70). In 1970, Tully had the Australian music world at their fingertips. They formed in late 1968, after a large section of hardworking rnb show band Levi Smiths Clefs broke away to focus on more adventurous material. By early 69 theyd become easily the most-hyped band in the nation, feverishly acclaimed for their towering rock dynamics and extended flights of jazz-inspired improvisation. U.S.-born keyboardist Michael Carlos played a Hammond organ with two huge Lesley speakers, while drummer Robert Taylor used two kick-drums for extra percussive drama. Richard Lockwood experimented restlessly on clarinet, flute and saxophone, eventually developing an amplified clarinet set-up, deepening and distorting his tone through an octave pedal and a massive Lenard amplifer. At first they were a kind of idiosyncratic cover band, playing 25 minute versions of Beatles hits, or their own take on Albert Aylers free jazz classic Bells. But they soon expanded into their own material, and were adopted as the ultimate consciousness-expanding experience in late 60s Australia. Excitable Go-Set journalist Adrian Rawlins called them "the greatest musicians in the western world." The first rock-based band to perform at Sydney Town Hall, Tully sold out repeated concerts there through 1969, became the house band for love-rock musical Hair, and even had their own six-part ABC TV series named Fusions. They headlined Australias first musical festival Pilgrimage For Pop, and outraged the classical establishment with their Love 200 performances. By mid-1970 an album was eagerly-awaited, and the resulting debut is one of Australias most forward-thinking and ambitious of the era. Opening track "You Realise, You Realise" bursts through the speakers with all the fabled power and exuberance of the bands live shows, while "La Nave Bleu" follows with delicacy and restraint. A full church choir uplifts "Loves White Dove," while "Phsssst" is five minutes of submerged organ drones, chanting and studio games. "Lace Space" must be one of the few drum solo tracks on a 60s/70s psych album capable of holding a modern listeners interest, and the album finishes with thunderous concert favorite "Waltz to Understanding." The album made it to number 6 in the charts, but within months of its release, Tully had changed into something almost unrecognizable from their original form. They merged with folk-psych sirens Extradition, lost singer Terry Wilson and drummer Taylor, and decided to continue on drummer-less. Their subsequent records were serene, solemn and impossibly beautiful, but without the incendiary power of their first incarnation, audiences deserted them in droves. By the end of 1971, Tully were no more. Reissued for the first time in 44 years, Tully documents a moment when anything seemed possible, and the band made music that perfectly summed up this sense of wonder and infinite potential. Includes a bonus track." - Chapter Music.

Artist: TULLY
Title: Tully
Format: CD
Label: Chapter Music
Country: Australia
Price: $16.00
"Chapter Music is thrilled to present the first-ever reissue of the self-titled debut album by Sydneys famed prog-psych giants, Tully. Originally released in June 1970, Tully is the final release in Chapters series of Tully reissues, which takes in surf soundtrack Sea Of Joy (1971), final album Loving Is Hard (1972) and Peter Sculthorpes composed rock opera Love 200 (released on 2010 CD Live at Sydney Town Hall 1969-70). In 1970, Tully had the Australian music world at their fingertips. They formed in late 1968, after a large section of hardworking rnb show band Levi Smiths Clefs broke away to focus on more adventurous material. By early 69 theyd become easily the most-hyped band in the nation, feverishly acclaimed for their towering rock dynamics and extended flights of jazz-inspired improvisation. U.S.-born keyboardist Michael Carlos played a Hammond organ with two huge Lesley speakers, while drummer Robert Taylor used two kick-drums for extra percussive drama. Richard Lockwood experimented restlessly on clarinet, flute and saxophone, eventually developing an amplified clarinet set-up, deepening and distorting his tone through an octave pedal and a massive Lenard amplifer. At first they were a kind of idiosyncratic cover band, playing 25 minute versions of Beatles hits, or their own take on Albert Aylers free jazz classic Bells. But they soon expanded into their own material, and were adopted as the ultimate consciousness-expanding experience in late 60s Australia. Excitable Go-Set journalist Adrian Rawlins called them "the greatest musicians in the western world." The first rock-based band to perform at Sydney Town Hall, Tully sold out repeated concerts there through 1969, became the house band for love-rock musical Hair, and even had their own six-part ABC TV series named Fusions. They headlined Australias first musical festival Pilgrimage For Pop, and outraged the classical establishment with their Love 200 performances. By mid-1970 an album was eagerly-awaited, and the resulting debut is one of Australias most forward-thinking and ambitious of the era. Opening track "You Realise, You Realise" bursts through the speakers with all the fabled power and exuberance of the bands live shows, while "La Nave Bleu" follows with delicacy and restraint. A full church choir uplifts "Loves White Dove," while "Phsssst" is five minutes of submerged organ drones, chanting and studio games. "Lace Space" must be one of the few drum solo tracks on a 60s/70s psych album capable of holding a modern listeners interest, and the album finishes with thunderous concert favorite "Waltz to Understanding." The album made it to number 6 in the charts, but within months of its release, Tully had changed into something almost unrecognizable from their original form. They merged with folk-psych sirens Extradition, lost singer Terry Wilson and drummer Taylor, and decided to continue on drummer-less. Their subsequent records were serene, solemn and impossibly beautiful, but without the incendiary power of their first incarnation, audiences deserted them in droves. By the end of 1971, Tully were no more. Reissued for the first time in 44 years, Tully documents a moment when anything seemed possible, and the band made music that perfectly summed up this sense of wonder and infinite potential. Includes a bonus track." - Chapter Music.

Artist: TULLY
Title: Sea of Joy
Format: CD
Label: EM
Country: Japan
Price: $21.00
"First time on CD & re-issue of the music for the classic Australian surf movie filmed by Paul Witzig in 1971, starring Wayne Lynce, Nat Young and Ted Spencer. Filmed in Australia, Mauritius, South Africa, Oahu and Kauai. The music was all written & performed by a psychedelic rock acid folk outfit called Tully featuring Richard Lockwood and Michael Carlos. The band that recorded Sea of Joy was the precocious child of two very different creatures, Tully the First (wild psychedelic & spiritual progressive rock) and Extradition (ethereal acid folk sounds, later survived the album entitled Hush). They played together once then became Tully the Second. The music they played for the soundtrack was engrossing and particularly enchanting (and still is!). You may find there will be nothing to compare such a recording with - not even other surf soundtracks or surfing-related music in the whole of surf music history (even now). Deep-psych-progressive-rock-acid folk surf in the early 1970s!" -Stephen McParland.

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