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Artist: FELDMAN, MORTON
Title: For Bunita Marcus
Format: Double LP
Label: God
Country: Austria
Price: $37.00
2014 release. Lenio Liatsou performs Morton Feldmans composition "For Bunita Marcus". In the 1980s, Morton Feldman composed two large-sized pieces for his favorite instrument, the piano. Both pieces, "Triadic Memories" (1981) and "For Bunita Marcus" (1985), clock in at about 90 minutes. Both compositions are excellent examples of the group of works that they belong to. "Triadic Memories" demonstrates the complexity and tonal opulence of Feldmans pattern compositions from 1977 through 1983, whereas "For Bunita Marcus" shows the stripped-down, almost dismissive structures of his last works created from 1984 to 1987. Feldman himself described "For Bunita Marcus" as a piece in which he "seriously grappled with the idea of meter. I was very interested in this whole problem of meter and the bar line. I was so interested that I started to write a piece in which I took meter very seriously. I saw that nobody knew how to notate. Sometimes, Stravinsky! In my notation Im close to Stravinsky; that is, meter and rhythm actually being simultaneous and also being more grid-oriented, a balance between rhythm and meter. For Bunita Marcus is essentially made up of just three-eight, five-sixteen and two-two. Sometimes the two-two would have musical content, which was at the end of the piece. Sometimes the two-two acted as silences, either on the left side or the right side or in the middle of the three-eight and the five-sixteen, and I was using meter as a construction, not rhythm but meter and the time, the length of what is going on." - Excerpt from liner notes by Sebastian Claren.

Artist: FELDMAN, MORTON
Title: String Quartet II
Format: 6LP Box Set
Label: God
Country: Austria
Price: $132.00
Excerpt from liner notes by Sebastian Claren: "When Morton Feldman wrote his second string quartet -- or String Quartet II, as he titled it in the score -- in 1983, he found himself at the height of his career: prior to this, his long form compositions, of which the majority lasted around one and a half hours, had not isolated him or let him disappear from concert and festival programming, as he had expected, but were on the contrary celebrated as a major breakthrough and a big step forward . . . Like the long pieces that preceded it, Feldmans String Quartet II consists of repeated patterns, which usually surface at a certain point in the composition without preparation, are maintained over a given period, and then abruptly abort to possibly return later. In this context, Feldman has always emphasized the interplay of reiteration and change in his music -- two aspects that in his mind had been decisive criteria of the music of the twentieth century as repetition and variation (Stravinsky and Schoenberg). He even claimed Schoenbergs concept of developing variation for his composition technique..." Live Recording! 317 minutes over six LPs. Personnel: Morton Feldman - composition; Pellegrini Quartet: Antonio Pellegrini - violin; Thomas Hofer - violin; Fabio Marano - viola; Helmut Menzler - violoncello.

Artist: FELDMAN, MORTON
Title: We, Like Salangan Swallows...: A Choral Gallery of Morton Feldman and Contemporaries
Format: CD
Label: New World
Country: USA
Price: $16.00
"The intense individuality of Morton Feldmans (1926?1987) art and its painterly aspect have tended to push his rich output of works into a zone all of their own, surrounded by a moat of stillness. This recording attempts the reverse process -- to bring his choral works (the previously unrecorded Chorus and Instruments, Voices and Instruments 1, Voices and Instruments 2, and The Swallows of Salangan) into a gallery of other choir compositions of his times. Through the interaction with works of other characters and aspirations, mutual illumination might become a new Feldman experience. Two of the five other works confront Feldmans textless choral singing with words. These, however, carry their own special musical intent. Three early twelve-tone gems [Three Statements] of Will Ogdon (1921?2013) move with Walt Whitman into the wordless . . . away from books, away from art, and reluctantly away from human desire, as embodied in the central poem by Thomas Campion. Robert Carls (b. 1954) The City brings a transcendentalist layered sound to the mystical reflections of the architect Louis Sullivan, contemplating the natural and the built-human in the lake and city of Chicago. The notion of wordless chorus fans out in varied directions in the other three works. As one of Feldmans closest associates in the New York School, Earle Brown (1926?2002) intrigues us as much for the stark differences from Feldman shown by his abstract choral mobiles (Small Pieces for Large Chorus). The Sound Patterns of Pauline Oliveros (1932?2016) are less abstract than their title might imply -- moving in and out of singing itself into extended vocality, and towards newly-suggested verbal exclamations of a non-semantic kind. Warren Burt (b. 1949), a former student of both Oliveros and Ogdon at the University of California, San Diego, contributes with his Elegy the most recent piece, also the closest to Feldmans simple successions of chorale-like chords. His harmonies, however, acquire their elegiac qualities from chromatic memories and their contradictions, moving along unfamiliar paths." - New World.

Artist: FELDMAN, MORTON
Title: Clarinet and String Quartet
Format: CD
Label: Saltern
Country: USA
Price: $16.00
"Saltern returns with a gorgeous new recording of Morton Feldmans Clarinet and String Quartet (1983) performed by Anthony Burr(clarinet), Graeme Jennings (violin), Gascia Ouzounian (violin), Che-Yen Chen (viola) and Charles Curtis (cello). This performance highlights Feldmans interest in notation by treating the slight differences in intonation and rhythm literally and specifically. Recorded by Tom Erbein the living room of a friend of the musicians. Edition of 400. Housed in jackets printed at Stoughton and featuring a cover image by artist Raha Raissnia. From Anthony Burr and Charles Curtiss liner notes: "Near the end of the final Contrapunctus in The Art Of Fugue, Bach introduces a new four-note countersubject which, in the German note names, spells B, A, C, H (in our note names, B-flat, A, C, B-natural). To those within Bachs circle, and probably to any attentive musician of his day, the notes thus sounded would have unmistakably articulated Bachs name -- an embedded signature, not just a melodic motif but a salutation in musical code. Morton Feldman begins Clarinet and String Quartet with the same four notes in reverse order -- H, C, A, B, if you will. These four notes are repeated over and over by the clarinet and the cello simultaneously, the two instruments in minutely different rhythms and phrasings. These notes, however, are given anomalous names: in the cello, B, D-double flat, G-double sharp, A-sharp; and in the clarinet, C-flat, C, A, B-flat. Whether or not Feldman placed the retrograde B, A, C, H motif intentionally, it fits seamlessly into the pitch world of his late music, in which chromatic clusters (often four notes) are obsessively restated in different permutations, like anagrams." - Saltern.

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